The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/257]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
The Contaminants of Mushroom Culture/235

Figure 174 Penicillium mold near to
transferred wedge of mushroom myceli-

Peniciiium mold along outer
periphery of petri dish.
Figure 175

urn.
denly an unfamiliar contaminant appears, identifying the vector can be much more difficult. Only
when the cultivator can pinpoint the variables leading to the introduction of that contaminant can appropriate counter-measures be applied. Frequently what seems to be an inconsequential alteration
in technique at one stage leads to a radical escalation of the contamination rate at later stages.
Since contamination at any phase of cultivation occurs for specific reasons, the contaminants
can be the cultivator's most valuable guide for teaching one what NOT to do. If the problem causing
organism is identified and if the recommended measures of control are carefully followed, a conscientious cultivator will avoid those conditions predisposing to that one competitor and, incidentally, many others. In effect, skill in mushroom culture is tantamount to skill in contamination control.
Molds and bacteria do not grow well in a climate specifically adjusted for mushrooms. Although
both mushrooms and contaminants prefer humid conditions, the latter thrive in prolonged stagnant
air environments whereas mushrooms do not. The differences are frequently subtle—amounting to
only a few percentage points in relative humidity and slight adjustments to the air intake dampers in
the growing room.

The contaminants can be divided into two well defined groups. Those attacking the mushrooms are called pathogens while fhose competing for the substrate are labeled indicators or
competitors. (Mushroom pathogens are either molds, bacteria, viruses or pests; indicators are
always fungi of some sort). In general, mushroom pathogens are not as numerous as the competitor
molds, though they can be much more devastating.

Not all molds and bacteria are damaging to the mushroom crop. To the contrarV, several are
beneficial. These can not be called true "contaminants" since cultivators try to promote, not hinder,

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor