The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/20]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
6/The Mushroom Cultivator
The cap is supported by a pillar-like stem that elevates the gills above ground where the spores can
be carried off by the slightest wind currents. Clearly, every part of the mushroom fruitbody is designed to give the spores the best opportunity to mature and spread in an external environment that
is often harsh and drastically fluctuating.

As the mushroom matures, spore production slows and eventually stops. At this time mushrooms are in their last hours of life. Soon decay from bacteria and other fungi sets in, reducing the
once majestic mushroom into a soggy mass of fetid tissue that melts into the ground from which it
sprung.

THE MUSHROOM LIFE CYCLE
Cultivating mushrooms is one of the best ways to observe the entirety of the Mushroom Life
Cycle. The life cycle first starts with a spore which produces a primary mycelium. When the mycehum originating from Iwo spores mates, a secondary mycelium is produced. This mycelium con-

tinues to grow vegetatively. When vegetative mycelium has matured, its cells are capable of a
phenomenal rate of reproduction which culminates in the erection of mushroom fruitbody. This
represents the last functional change and it has become, in effect, tertiary mycehium. These types of
mycehia represent the three major phases in the progression of the mushroom life cycle.

Most mushrooms produce spores that are uninucleate and genetically haploid (1 N). This
means each spore contains one nucleus and has half the complement of chromosomes for the
species. Thus spores have a "sex" in that each has to mate with mycehia from another spore type to
be fertile for producing offspring. When spores are first released they are fully inflated "moist" cells
that can easily germinate. Soon they dehydrate, collapsing at their centers and in this phase they can
sit dormant through long periods of dry weather or severe drought. When weather conditions pro-

Figure 3 Scanning electron micrograph
of Russula spores.

Figure 4 Scanning electron micrograph
of Entoloma spores.

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