The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/199]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Growing Parameters for Various Mushroom Species/ 177

STRAINS: Numerous strains of Lentinus edodes are available from commercial and private
stocks. The American Type Culture Collection, which sells cultures to educational organizations
and research facilities, has stock cultures of several wild and domesticated strains. Strains are often
distinquished by their preferences for fruiting in colder or warmer temperature zones.

COMMON NAMES: The Shiitake Mushroom; The Japanese Black Mushroom; and The Chinese
Black Mushroom. (The name shiltake comes from the association of this mushroom to the shiia
free, a member of the genus Pasania).

LATIN AND GREEK ROOTS: Lentinus comes from "lentis" or lens-shaped for the form of the
cap and edodes signifies the edibility of this species.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Cap pale to dark reddish brown, convex, becoming broadly convex
to nearly plane in age. The cap margin is typically inrolled when young. The cap surface is covered
with whitish veil remnants, especially along the margin. The flesh is firm, pliant, easily drying and reconstituting. The gills are whitish, close to crowded, often with serrated edges. The stem is centrally
attached to the cap, short, very tough and adorned with scattered fibrillose remnants of the partial
veil. Its spores are whitish in mass.

NATURAL HABITAT: A wood decom poser, typically saprophytic. Len tinus species are common
on the dead tissue of deciduous trees, mainly Fagaceae (oak, chestnut, shiia [Pasania] and beech).
In nature, they particularly prefer oaks. Fruiting in the fall, early winter and spring, this species is indigenous to Japan, China and other countries in the temperate zone of the Indo-China region.

GROWTH PARAMETERS
Mycelial Types: Rhizomorphic to linear.
Spawn Medium: Pre-soaked wooden dowels or a 4:1 sawdust/bran mixture. See Chapter Ill.

Fruiting Substrate and Method of Preparation: Oak or alder logs, 4-6 inches in diameter, are
sawed into 3 foot lengths. These logs should be cut in the spring or fall to maximize sap content and
can be inoculated immediately. (Some growers prefer to season their logs in shaded, open air stacks

for one month prior to inoculation). Before inoculating, logs should be cleaned of any lichen or
fungal growths.
Alternative fruiting substrates include alder or oak sawdust and bran mixed 4:1 with a moisture
content of 60% and sterilized at 1 5 psi for 1 -1 ½ hours. Fortified rye grass straw has also been used

as a sterile fruiting medium. (See Chapter III).

Spawn Run:
Relative Humidity: 60-75% for logs; 90% for sawdust.
Substrate Temperature: Fast growth at 77°F. (Temperatures above 95°F. and below 41 °F.
stop mycelial growth).
Duration: 6-12 months for cut logs; 30-60 days for sawdust blocks.
C02: None established; no controls needed using these methods.

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