The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/164]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
150/The Mushroom Cultivator
or the home cultivator the onset of cropping is a time of excitement and anticipation. It is also a
time for increased attention to the finer details of environmental control. Temperature, humidity, light and airflow in the growing room all play vital roles which together determine the nature of
further mushroom development.

F

Tern perafu re
During the vegetative growth period, the substrate was held in the optimum range by careful
manipulation of the air temperature. But once the change to generative growth is initiated, the substrate temperature becomes less important and air temperature becomes the controlling factor.
The time it takes button sized mushrooms to mature is influenced primarily by the air temperature of the growing chamber. Each species has an optimum temperature for fruitbody development that lies within a broader growing range. Knowing the temperature parameters as outlined in
Chapter Xl, the cultivator can speed or slow development depending on which end of the cropping
range is chosen. Lower temperatures can be used to postpone or lengthen the harvesting period
and allow for maximum quality control. High temperatures serve to shorten the cropping period by
promoting rapid, intense flushes. However, the dangers of high temperatures include the risk of
heat building up in the substrate and consequent CO2 generation, as well as the ability of insects and
contaminants to grow and reproduce at faster rates. Commericia! Agaricus growers commonly
lower the air temperature by 2 °F. 48 hours prior to the peak of the first and second flushes. Further
flushes are then run hotter to speed the crop to completion. It is important that the cultivator evaluate the heat generating capabilities of the crop and insure that the environmental control system is
capable of handling them.

Flushing Pattern
The mushroom crop grows in cycles called flushes or "breaks". Depending on the species being grown these flushes nôrmally come in seven to ten day intervals with each successive flush bearing fewer mushrooms. The manner in which these flushes appear is determined during the pin initiation period. Even pinning sets up a uniform pattern of flushing that continues throughout the cropping cycle. Uneven flushing creates difficult situations for proper watering and environmental control. To encourage even flushing, early forming pinheads are picked off as buttons unless it appears
that these pins constitute the flush itself. Poor first flushes are indicative of faulty pinning procedures
and lead to lower total yields and a longer cropping period as the cultivator tries to maximize yields
from the following flushes. But keep in mind that many times it is the progressive build-up of competing contaminant organisms that eventually bring mushroom growth to a halt. For this reason, the

goal is to maximize yields in the early flushes.
To further increase the flushing speed the actual harvest period in each flush should be kept
short and concise. Late developing mushrooms are removed with or on the day after peak production. The sooner the flush is completely removed the quicker the next one will appear and the short-

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