The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/161]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Strategies for Mushroom Formation/147

2. The greater the number of pins set for the first flush, the higher the yield, provided
sufficient nutrients are available to support their growth. However, with more pinheads
competing for the same nutrient base, the smaller are the mushrooms arising from it. Fewer
pinheads result in larger mushrooms, but lower total yields.

3. The substrate will only support the development of a certain number of primor.
dia per flush. Under normal circumstances with an even pin-set, pinheads may "abort"
because of insufficient nutrients or late formation.

4. Pins that form early delay the growth of neighboring primordia. Good examples of
this can be found in shallow areas or along the borders of the substrate container. Removing these relatively few "volunteers" before they develop is advantageous to the remaining
primordia that constitute the first flush.

THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT
ON PINHEAD INITIATION
Mushroom species requiring light for primordia formation are said to be photosensitive. Although light is not necessary to induce fructification in all mushrooms (i.e. Agaricus brunnescens),
certain spectra have proven to be stimulatory to pinhead initiation and are critical for the normal development of the fruitbody. Psilocybe cubensis and Pleurotus ostreatus are two such photosensitive
species.

A thorough investigation on the photosensitivity of Psilocybe cubensis can be found in a master's thesis by E.R. Badham (1 979). His work reinforces the conclusions of other researchers working with the Basidiomycetes: more pinheads are initiated upon exposure to blue and ultra-violet light

with distinct peaks at 370, 440 and 460 nanometers. Badham showed that light stimulation at
these wavelengths for as little as half a millisecond per day caused primordia to form. In contrast,
red, infra-red and green light having wavelengths greater than 510 nanometers were ineffective.
With this knowledge, the cultivator of photosensitive species can develop initiation strategies
incorporating the influence of light. Ideally a fully colonized substrate should be incubated in total
darkness and exposed to light only after the mycelium first shows through the casing layer. If the
cultivator wants to check the culture without the chance of premature pinning, red light is recommended. (The proper location and type of light is discussed in more detail in Chapter IV).

PDF compression, OCR, web-optimization with CVISION's PdfCompressor