The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

: [url=http://txt.drevle.com/text/stamets-mushroom_cultivator-a_practical_guide-1983/126]Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983[/url]
 

Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
112/The Mushroom Cultivator
The bed must never be placed where it is exposed to direct sunlight but it should not be so well protected that rainfall can not reach it.

During the spring and summer the mycelium colonizes the fresh substrate which should be
covered with plastic or cardboard to prevent drying. A weekly watering helps to keep the moisture
content high. In the fall the bed is uncovered and given a heavy watering twice a week, but with care
not to flood it. When the mushrooms begin to fruit, watering should be gauged according to environmental conditions and natural precipitation. As long as the temperature stays above freezing the
mushrooms will grow continuously. If a freeze is expected, the beds can be protected with a plastic
covering. Extended freezing weather ends outdoor cropping until the following year.
Throughout the winter the beds can be protected by a layer of straw, cardboard or new chips
topped with plastic. This is particularly important for harsh climates. Other possibilities include making the bed inside a cold frame or plastic greenhouse. Certain regions of the country like the Northwest are better suited to natural culture than others. In this respect it is desirable to use a local strain
adapted to local conditions. In climates unsuited to outdoor cultivation, the wood chips can be filled
into trays and brought inside.
Once the primary bed has been established outdoors, it can be likened to a perennial plant,
which is the nature of mushroom mycelium. indoor spawn preparation and incubation become Unnecessary. With each successive year chips can be drawn from the original bed and used as inoculum. This means that the total bed area can be multiplied by five on an annual basis. (See Figure
1 64 of Psilocybe cyanescens fruiting indoors in tray of alder chips).

Figure 104 Oak dowels before and after colonization by
shiitake (Lentinus edodes) mycelium.

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