The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
1 10/The Mushroom Cultivator
he use of non-composted and semi-composted materials as mushroom growing substrates is
common among commercial growers of Pleurotus, Voivarielia, FIamm ui/na and Stropharia.
Because of the simplicity and ease by which they are produced, these substrates are ideal for the
home cultivator. The advantages of these substrates are the rapid preparation times and the easily
standardized mixtures formulated from readily available raw materials. These substrates can be
treated by sterilization, pasteurization or used untreated in their natural state.

T

NATURAL CULTURE
culture
For most people mushroom cultivation implies an indoor process employing sterile
Although
this
has
been
the
natural
progression
techniques and a controlled growing environment.
round crops, it
of events for commercial cultivators and is the only way to consistently grow year
the
home
cultivator.
For
hundreds
of
years
home growers
need not be the sole method available to
In fact,
enjoyed
harvesting
seasonal
crops
of
mushrooms.
have made up outdoor beds and have
techcommercially
were
originally
grown
using
natural
culture
most mushrooms now being grown
niques.

By observing wild mushrooms fruiting in their natural habitats, one can begin to understand
their growth requirements. To fully illustrate how this methodology works, the development of natural culture for Psilocybe cyanescens will be used as an example. Psilocybe cyanescens grows along
fence lines and hedge rows, in tall rank grass, in berry thickets, in well mulched rhododendron beds,
in piles of wood chips and shavings and in ecologically disturbed areas. In many instances, the
mushrooms are found growing in soil, but upon close examination of the underlying mycelial net-

work, it is apparent that they are feeding on wood or other similar cellulosic material. Due to the
thick strandy mycelium of Psilocybe cyanescens, it is relatively easy to locate and gather colonized

Figure 102

Virgin spawn: Psilocybe cyanescens mycelium on a wood chip.

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