The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home

Paul Stamets. The mushroom cultivator. A practical guide to growing mushrooms at home. - Agarikon press, 1983

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Содержание

FOREWORD by Dr. Andrew Weil

PREFACE

I. INTRODUCTION TO MUSHROOM CULTURE

II. STERILE TECHNIQUE AND AGAR CULTURE

III. GRAIN CULTURE

IV. THE MUSHROOM GROWING ROOM

V. COMPOST PREPARATION

VI. NON-COMPOSTED SUBSTRATES

VII. SPAWNING AND SPAWN RUNNING IN BULK SUBSTRATES

VIII. THE CASING LAYER

IX. STRATEGIES FOR MUSHROOM FORMATION (PINHEAD INITIATION)

X. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS: SUSTAINING THE MUSHROOM CROP

XL GROWING PARAMETERS FOR VARIOUS MUSHROOM SPECIES

XII. CULTIVATION PROBLEMS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS: A TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE

XIII. THE CONTAMINANTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE: IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL

XIV. THE PESTS OF MUSHROOM CULTURE

XV. MUSHROOM GENETICS

APPENDICES

GLOSSARY

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATION CREDITS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

OCR
Compost Preparation/93

Figure 91

Pile Tormers in use.

pre-wetting, supplementing and pile building easier, they can be used to turn the pile.
3.

Pile formers. These are constructed from 2 x 4's and plywood or planks to the dimensions desired for the compost pile One for each side is necessary. Standard size would be
4-5 feet high by 8 feet long. An alternative to pile formers is a three sided bin.

4. Long handled pitchfork with 4 or 5 prongs. The basic fool in a compost yard, all composf piles were turned with pitchforks before the advenf of compost turners and bucket
loaders.

5. Flat bladed shovel. Used for handling supplements.

6. Hose with spray nozzle, or sprinkler.
7. Thermometers. Although pile temperatures can be guaged by touch, a long stemmed
thermometer gives accurate readings.

Characteristics of the Compost at Filling
The composting materials undergo very distinct changes during Phase I. A judgment as to the
suitability of the compost for filling is based on color, texture and odor. Gradual darkening of the
straw and the pronounced scent of ammonia are the most obvious features. These and other characteristics provide important guidelines for judging the right time for filling the compost. (Note:
these guideslines do not apply for a compost prepared by the Long Composting methods.)

The compost is ready for filling if:

1. Compost is uniformly deep brown.
2. Straw is still long and fibrous, but can be sheared with some resistance.
3. When the compost is firmly squeezed, liquid appears between the fingers.

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