Growing gourmet and medical mushrooms

Paul Stamets. Growing gourmet and medical mushrooms. - Ten Speed Press, 2000

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Содержание

1. Mushrooms, Civilization and History

2. The Role of Mushrooms in Nature

3.Selecting a Candidate for Cultivation

4. Natural Culture: Creating Mycological Landscapes

5. The Stametsian Model: Permaculture with a Mycological Twist

6. Materials fo rFormulating a Fruiting Substrate

7. Biological Efficiency: An Expression of Yield

8. Home-made vs. Commercial Spawn

9. The Mushroom Life Cycle

10. The Six Vectors of Contamination

11. Mind and Methods for Mushroom Culture

12. Culturing Mushroom Mycelium on Agar Media

13. The Stock Culture Library: A Genetic Bank of Mushroom Strains

14. Evaluating a Mushroom Strain

15. Generating Grain Spawn

16. Creating Sawdust Spawn

17. Growing Gourmet Mushrooms on Enriched Sawdust

18. Cultivating Gourmet Mushrooms on Agricultural Waste Products

19. Cropping Containers

20. Casing: A Topsoil Promoting Mushroom Formation

21. Growth Parameters for Gourmet and Medicinal Mushroom Species

Spawn Run: Colonizing the Substrate

Primordia Formation: The Initiation Strategy

Fruitbody (Mushroom) Development

The Gilled Mushrooms

The Polypore Mushrooms of the Genera Ganoderma, Grifola and Polyporus

The Lion’s Mane of the Genus Hericium

The Wood Ears of the Genus Auricularia

The Morels: Land-Fish Mushrooms of the Genus Morchella

The Morel Life Cycle

22. Maximizing the Substrate’s Potential through Species Sequencing

23. Harvesting, Storing, and Packaging the Crop for Market

24. Mushroom Recipes: Enjoying the Fruits of Your Labors

25. Cultivation problems & Their Solutions: A Troubleshoting guide

Appendices

I. Description of Environment for a Mushroom Farm

II. Designing and Building A Spawn Laboratory

III. The Growing Room: An Environment for Mushroom Formation & Development

IV. Resource Directory

V. Analyses of Basic Materials Used in Substrate Preparation

VI. Data Conversion Tables

Glossary

Bibliography

Acknowledgments

OCR
GROWTH PARAMETERS

411

Profile of Natural Initiation Strategy

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Daily temperature fluctuation in topsoil layer—2'-4'—from a wild Morel patch
by Paul
in Mason County, Washington.

Figure 369. Temperature fluctuation for a period prior to, and during outdoor fruitings of Morels (Morchella
angusticeps). Note that the temperature fluctuation for primordia formation occurred within 40-60° F. (5-15° C.)

Available Strains: Strains are readily obtained from wild clones or spore germinations. The mycelium out-races most competitors and can easily be isolated from contaminants.

Mycelial Characteristics: Mycelium at first fine, divergent, fast running, non-aerial and initially
gray, soon thickening becoming gray-brown, with young clones developing numerous brown with
orangish to golden nodules which I call "micro-sclerotia". (See Figure 361.) As the mycelium matures, the nutrified agar media becomes stained dark brown. (By viewing the petri dish cultures from
underneath, the staining of the medium is clearly seen.) As cultures over-mature, the mycelium resembles squirrel's fur. When the mycelium is implanted into unsterilized wood chips, an powdery
gray mildew forms on the surface. This asexual stage, resembling oidia, has been been classified as
Costantinella cristata. I do not see this expression on agar or grain media.
Fragrance Signature: Mycelium pleasant, smelling liked crushed, fresh Morel mushrooms. After
transferring each jar of grain spawn, I am compelled to deeply inhale the residual gases still within
each container. (A sure symptom of a Morel addict.)
Natural Method of Cultivation: Although my attempts to grow the White Morel (Morchella esculenta)
indoors have only produced stunted mushrooms, I have had fairly consistent success at growing the Black
Morels (Morchella angusticeps) outdoors in burned areas topped with peat moss or hardwood sawdust
(oak or alder) supplemented with calcium sulfate. When Black Morel mycelium is dispersed into an outdoor burn-site, the cultivator relinquishes control to the natural weather conditions. In effect, nature

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