Growing gourmet and medical mushrooms

Paul Stamets. Growing gourmet and medical mushrooms. - Ten Speed Press, 2000

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Содержание

1. Mushrooms, Civilization and History

2. The Role of Mushrooms in Nature

3.Selecting a Candidate for Cultivation

4. Natural Culture: Creating Mycological Landscapes

5. The Stametsian Model: Permaculture with a Mycological Twist

6. Materials fo rFormulating a Fruiting Substrate

7. Biological Efficiency: An Expression of Yield

8. Home-made vs. Commercial Spawn

9. The Mushroom Life Cycle

10. The Six Vectors of Contamination

11. Mind and Methods for Mushroom Culture

12. Culturing Mushroom Mycelium on Agar Media

13. The Stock Culture Library: A Genetic Bank of Mushroom Strains

14. Evaluating a Mushroom Strain

15. Generating Grain Spawn

16. Creating Sawdust Spawn

17. Growing Gourmet Mushrooms on Enriched Sawdust

18. Cultivating Gourmet Mushrooms on Agricultural Waste Products

19. Cropping Containers

20. Casing: A Topsoil Promoting Mushroom Formation

21. Growth Parameters for Gourmet and Medicinal Mushroom Species

Spawn Run: Colonizing the Substrate

Primordia Formation: The Initiation Strategy

Fruitbody (Mushroom) Development

The Gilled Mushrooms

The Polypore Mushrooms of the Genera Ganoderma, Grifola and Polyporus

The Lion’s Mane of the Genus Hericium

The Wood Ears of the Genus Auricularia

The Morels: Land-Fish Mushrooms of the Genus Morchella

The Morel Life Cycle

22. Maximizing the Substrate’s Potential through Species Sequencing

23. Harvesting, Storing, and Packaging the Crop for Market

24. Mushroom Recipes: Enjoying the Fruits of Your Labors

25. Cultivation problems & Their Solutions: A Troubleshoting guide

Appendices

I. Description of Environment for a Mushroom Farm

II. Designing and Building A Spawn Laboratory

III. The Growing Room: An Environment for Mushroom Formation & Development

IV. Resource Directory

V. Analyses of Basic Materials Used in Substrate Preparation

VI. Data Conversion Tables

Glossary

Bibliography

Acknowledgments

OCR
362

GROWTH
cap development can begin.

In its natural habitat, this change is analocarbon
gous to the stalk emerging from the rich

dioxide environment below ground level. Once
the CO2 sensitive stalk emerges into the open
spore producing lateral
air, the
plateau
cap develops. The caps form above the

of the ground and orient towards directional
light. An indication of new growth is the depth

and prominent appearance of a white band
around the cap's edge. Under these conditions,
cap formation is rapid and the time of harvest is

usually indicated by the lack of new margin
growth and the production of rusty brown
spores. The spores, although released from below, tend to accumulate on the upper plane of
the cap.
The cultivator has two alternatives for eliciting conk development once antlers have begun

Figure 325. Some strains will not form stems if
levels.
carbon dioxide is maintained at atmospheric

to form. The plastic bag can be left on or
stripped away from the mass of myceliurnl

wood chips/sawdust. If the protective plastic is
removed and a fog-like environment does not
development. If the exposed block is maintained
prevail, massive evaporation will halt any fruitbody vertical stalk growth slows or abates entirely and
in a fog-like environment within the growing room,

White margin denotes new growth.

the characteristic horizontal kidney-shaped
the
cap begins to differentiate. Like the stalk,
margins of new growth are whitish while the

aged areas take on a shiny burgundy brown appearance.
Cultivators in Asia inoculate 1-2 liter cylin-

drical bags or bottles, narrowly closed at one
end and stopped with a cotton plug. Once in-

oculated, the bags or bottles are stacked

horizontally in a wall-like fashion. After 30-60
days, depending upon the strain, inoculation
rate, and growing conditions, the cotton filters
CO2
are removed. The small opening channels
This
same
openstimulating stem elongation.
ing is also the only conduit for moisture loss.
From this portal, finger-like primordial shoots

Figure 326. When the plastic is removed, exposing
the mycelium, G. lucidum will only form when a con-

densing fog environment is maintained for a
prolonged period.

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